Fall 2017 - Florence, Italy

Alan Sonfist, Island of Paradise

Alan Sonfist will be completing the Island of Paradise in Tuscany that will visualize the iconography of Florence. The artwork will collage the natural history with the cultural history of the area. The dedication will be in the early fall.

ICA Speaks: Hernan Bas

 
 

ICA NEXT Members and above are invited to a private meet-and-greet and sake tasting with Miami-born, Detroit-based artist Hernan Bas preceding his talk for ICA Speaks. Sake is provided courtesy of SOTO Sake. Signed copies of Hernan Bas’ Rizzoli monograph will be available for purchase at the event.

Hernan Bas mixed emotions, 2016 Acrylic and enamel on linen 72 x 60 inches

Hernan Bas
mixed emotions, 2016
Acrylic and enamel on linen
72 x 60 inches

ABOUT HERNAN BAS

Hernan Bas (b. 1978, Miami, Florida) creates works born of literary intrigue and tinged with nihilistic romanticism and old world imagery. Influenced by the Aesthetic and Decadent writers of the 19th century, in particular Oscar Wilde and Joris-Karl Huysman, Bas’s works weave together stories of adolescent adventures and the paranormal with classical poetry, religious stories, mythology and literature.

Bas’s work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions around the world, including a major presentation at the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, in 2007, which subsequently traveled to the Brooklyn Museum in 2008, and a retrospective exhibition at the Kunstverein Hannover, Germany, in 2012. In 2013, Bas presented the multi-media installation, “TIME, Hernan Bas: a queer and curious cabinet” at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, FL and in 2014, Rizzoli published a monograph on the artist, the most comprehensive book of his work to date. Bas has participated in a number of important group exhibitions, including “The Collectors,” curated by Elmgreen & Dragset for the Nordic and Danish Pavilions at the 53rd Venice Biennale (2009); Triumph of Painting: Part III, Saatchi Gallery, London, and Ideal Worlds – New Romanticism in Contemporary Art, Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt (both 2005); and the 2004 Whitney Biennale. His work is part of the permanent collections of New York’s Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and Whitney Museum of American Art; as well as the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. The artist lives and works in Detroit, Michigan.

A Fertile Universe: Tomás Esson’s Miami Flow

On the kitch, scatology, and blunt force of Esson’s art, and his recent show in Miami

Published: April 25, 2017

Installation view of Tomás Esson: Miami Flow at Fredric Snitzer Gallery

Installation view of Tomás Esson: Miami Flow at Fredric Snitzer Gallery

Janet Batet surveys the art and career of Tomás Esson, and the tormented, mythological beings, erogenous plant life, and other motifs that populate his art, including the show that just closed in Miami.

Miami Flow is the title of Tomas Esson's latest solo show, recently presented at Fredric Snitzer Gallery in Mimai. The concise and at the same time exuberant exhibition includes six colossal paintings and an installation, composed of a series of drawings from the series Wet Painting. This work goes beyond the physical limit of the frame to become an immersive installation that overflows its boundaries.

Tomaás Esson Reid (Havana, 1963) is undoubtedly one of the most forceful painters in contemporary Cuban art. Esson`s indisputable technical mastery makes the contemplation of his work a delight, always. Paradoxically, both this pictorial ecstasy and its savoir-faire are inevitably shaken by the issues that the work addresses, with kitsch, scatology, and violent elements emerging as leitmotifs Esson's pictorial entities are visceral portraits of that caged anguish that is human existence: vulvas, penises, jars, ejaculations, spit, pubic hair, and indescribable beings who share the tormented condition of beast and demigods, simultaneously animals in heat and spiritual beings.

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Fredric Snitzer Gallery at the Armory Show

Rafael Domenech  Untitled (Turangalîla), 2017. Aluminum, plexiglass, archival print on paper, re-purposed graphic material, enamel paint, plastic zipties 49 x 38 x 28 inches

 

The Armory Show
March 2 - 5th, 2017

Rafael Domenech
Pier 94, Booth 911

 

Location  
Piers 92 & 94
711 12th Avenue, New York, 10019

Hours
Thursday, March 2: 12–8pm
Friday, March 3: 12–8pm
Saturday, March 4: 12–7pm
Sunday, March 5: 12–6pm

 

 

Rafael Domenech

Pleiades: Sistema Progresivo (the organic, inorganic, and the light)

In Greek mythology the word Pleiades refers to the seven daughters of Atlas. The contemporary usage of the term in the fields of astronomy and cosmology applies to a cluster of objects colliding in space.

Rafael Domenech utilizes the concept of Pleiades as structure and tool to organize a sequence of artworks in space, forming a pattern where all the pieces presented have either physical or theoretical connections. The works function not only as individual pieces, but also as integral components of a larger system.

The artist’s current output is rooted in ideas of system, surplus and contamination, mostly a result of a dedicated, investigative approach towards such topics. In this work, he has brought forth these notions to shape a series of pieces that examine formal connections that surfaced during fabrication. It is at this stage where a clear understanding forms on how materials affect and define the trajectory of an object.

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Domenech perceives the city as a store where he can acquire experiences, objects and ideas, with the studio as a space to develop theoretical content, a visual laboratory where aesthetic and formal results are the logical outcome of specific investigations.  Largely, he examines the complex processes of constructing an image. Whether this is in the form of a sculpture, collage, or artist book, the process is always open to be impacted with new information, often with the incorporation of waste resulting from its own production. 

The work stems from the study of networks and their physical composition. This approach embraces complex and challenging notions such as contamination, renewal, implosion, repetition and surplus, ideas that are intrinsic to our contemporary society. Their convergence is catalyst for expanding the investigation, acting as fuel to increase a critical perception of materials and their inherent behavior.

Domenech’s work has recently been exhibited at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York; Artium Museum in Vitoria, Spain; The Rockefeller Foundation, New York; The Mordes Collection, Palm Beach. In 2015, Rafael was the recipient of the Tulsa Artist Fellowship and the Cintas Fellowship. His work is included in the public collections of The Perez Art Museum Miami and Cintas Foundation.

Kenny Scharf and Carlos Alfonzo in the New York Times

Carlos Alfonzo (1950-1991) Told, 1990. Oil on linen. 96 1/8 × 72 1/8 in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of Mrs. Sena Artigas in memory of Carlos M. Artigas

Painting From the 1980s, When Brash Met Flash

By ROBERTA SMITH

FEB. 9, 2017

In New York at the end of the 1970s, many people thought painting was all washed up. And if not washed up, it had to be abstract — the more austere, unemotional and geometric, the better.

Then came the 1980s and a generation of young painters, like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Eric Fischl, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, and everything changed. With “Fast Forward: Painting From the 1980s,” an irresistible if flawed exhibition, the Whitney Museum tries to sort out how that happened.

The ’80s artists were initially called Neo-Expressionist, an insufficient term, given their stylistic diversity, but one that signaled their accessibility and flair. They drew from art history, the news, graffiti and pop culture. Their work embraced different forms of 

"The work brims with talent and ambition"
 -Roberta Smith, The New York Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

narrative, often with psychological or erotic overtones, and new kinds of self-awareness and worldliness. Even those who painted abstractly had it, in the form of humor or outside references. Across the board, many worked in large scale, often physically eccentric ways.

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"The heady sense of the 1980s is felt right off the elevator in three works rooted in street art and graffiti, each presenting a complex world in a distinct style."  -Roberta Smith, The New York Times

Kenny Scharf (1958-) When the Worlds Collide, 1984. 2016 Oil and acrylic spray paint on canvas. 122 5/16 × 209 5/16 in./ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alice Aycock artist talk at Coral Gables Museum

   View of sculpture designed by Alice Acyock, Passion/Passiflora Incarnation, on Segovia Street and Biltmore way.

   View of sculpture designed by Alice Acyock, Passion/Passiflora Incarnation, on Segovia Street and Biltmore way.

Friday, December 2nd, 4:00 pm- 6:00 pm

 

Join the Coral Gables Museum with New York based artist
Alice Aycock for an Art Talk about
her sculpture, ‘Passion/Passiflora Incarnation‘ located in Coral Gables, FL.

 

Venue Information:

Coral Gables Art Museum
285 Aragon Avenue
Coral Gables, FL 33134

T: (305) 603-8067

Alan Sonfist Time Capsule in Belgium

“An acorn is potentially, but not actually, an oak tree.  In becoming an oak tree, it becomes actually what it originally was only potentially.  This change thus involves passage from potentiality to actuality—not from nonbeing to being, but from one kind or degree to being another.” -Aristotle

“In the 20th century, it was man overcoming nature.  In the 21st, we must understand that we are of our environment.  My art echoes understanding of nature’s rhythms.” -Alan Sonfist

 

What if a former blight on the landscape held within it an entire ecological system? Alan Sonfist’s “Time Landscape” series of recreating ancient landscapes in contemporary settings continues, coming from places like New York City in the United States and Sienna, Italy to Antwerp, Belgium. His new work is a marriage of the natural world and its grand destroyer. A massive steel tube housing plants and seeds indigenous to the area, the “Time Capsule of Belgium” presents an industrial structure as the newfound nursery of endangered plant life — a smokestack protecting the very species that similar manufacturing technologies have steadily wiped out. An idiosyncratic rarity, here a green space will be berthed from a vessel of pollution, and thus these once antagonistic forces will finally become collaborators.

 
 

art and culture center/ Hollywood presents upcoming exhibition Pleiades: Sistema 10 by Rafael Domeneh

Rafael Domenech
Untitled, 2016
Plexiglass, mixed media
20 x 48 x 20 inches
 

In Greek mythology the word Pleiades refers to the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione.  The contemporary usage of the term in the fields of astronomy and cosmology applies to a cluster of objects colliding in space.

Domenech utilizes the concept of Pleiades as structure and tool to organize a sequence of artworks in space, forming a pattern where all the pieces presented have either physical or theoretical connections. The works function not only as individual pieces, but also as integral components of a larger system.

The artist’s current output is rooted in ideas of system, surplus and contamination, mostly a result of a dedicated, investigative approach towards such topics. In this work, he has brought forth these notions to shape a series of pieces that examine formal connections that surfaced during fabrication. It is at this stage where a clear understanding forms on how materials affect and define the trajectory of an object.



Artist Talk
Wednesday, November 30, 6:30pm

Exhibition on view November 5, 2016 - January 8, 2017
Art and Culture Center/ Hollywood
1650 Harrison Street
Hollywood, FL 33020

 

 
 

 

Alice Aycock Sculpture coming to Coral Gables

More than a year after being approved by Coral Gables commissioners, two new colorful sculptures are being installed at the traffic circles along Segovia Street.

Artist rendering. The two sculptures by Alice Aycock, depicting passion flowers, which celebrate Coral Gables’ roots as a Garden City, will be installed at Segovia Traffic Circles at Coral Way and Biltmore Way.

Artist rendering. The two sculptures by Alice Aycock, depicting passion flowers, which celebrate Coral Gables’ roots as a Garden City, will be installed at Segovia Traffic Circles at Coral Way and Biltmore Way.

 

BY Onelia Collazo Mendive
GABLESCENTRAL.COM

New York artist Alice Aycock was chosen by the Coral Gables City Commission on Nov. 18, 2014 to create the first major public art monuments since Coral Gables founder George Merrick’s day. The two sculptures depicting passion flowers, which celebrate Coral Gables’ roots as a Garden City, will be installed on Segovia Traffic Circles at Coral Way and Biltmore Way. Aycock is a nationally renowned public artist whose sculptures are on display at major museums and public spaces across the country, including a recent installation on Park Avenue. Aycock’s proposal calls for a large sculpture with fountain features at the intersection of Biltmore Way and a smaller sculpture at Coral Way. Aycock was chosen after a panel of arts experts reviewed 181 submissions from around the world.

 

 

 

Coachella Festival 2016

Alexandre Arrechea at Coachella Festival, 2016

Art plays a pivotal role in defining the Coachella experience. Each year Coachella features art from artists worldwide. Find them all throughout the polo grounds. Some might even find you!

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival (commonly referred to as Coachella or the Coachella Festival) is an annual music and arts festival held at the Empire Polo Club in Indio, California, located in the Inland Empire’s Coachella Valley in the Colorado Desert. It was founded by Paul Tollett in 1999.
The event features many genres of music, including rock, indie, hip hop, and electronic dance music, as well as art installations and sculptures.
Coachella is one of the largest, most famous, and most profitable music festivals in the United States.
The 2015 festival sold 198,000 tickets and grossed $84.3 million, both world records.

Katrina Chairs, 2016